frank lloyd wright christopher a. frank

Walala X Play

Walala X Play by  Camille Walala

Walala X Play by Camille Walala

Artist/designer, Camille Walala, has created an eye-popping interactive installation, WALALA X PLAY, that’s complete with her signature graphic patterns, geometric shapes, and bold colors. She created a colorful maze that references the waterways of the Greenwich Peninsula, the curve of the Thames, and the shape and angles of the building. WALALA X PLAY is on display at the NOW Gallery in London.

Her signature Tribal POP style present a boundless energy that work perfectly for show-stopping and social spaces - “the bigger the better”.
— camillewalala.com

House in the Dunes

chris+frank.jpg

An architect and 3D animation specialist, Michał Szulik is the mastermind behind the House of Dunes project. The beautiful interior and exterior design of this home is a shining example of minimalism, using accent pieces such as walls and hardware to contrast the white negative space that dominates the home. Utilizing a black and white color scheme and reclaimed wood throughout, this home is brilliantly thought-out and decorated. And the most interesting part of this home? It is 100% computer-rendered and not the least bit real. Enjoy the video at the end of the blog which shows a rendered walkthrough of this lovely concept home.

chris+frank+cfx.jpg
chris+frank+st+louis.jpg
chris+a+frank.jpg
chris+a+frank+cfx.jpg
chris+a+frank+st+louis.jpg
christopher+frank.jpg
christopher+frank+cfx.jpg
christopher+frank+st+louis.jpg

Cozy Cotton

chris+frank.jpg

Specializing in furniture, art, cooking products, linens, and other home accessories, Cozy Cotton is a Korean online shop focused on home furnishing. Tom Jueris spearheaded this beautiful packaging and branding project for the company. His elegant combination of all-caps serif, italic, and handwritten fonts create a personalized and upscale feeling, further propelled by the simple yet luxurious photography.

chris+a+frank.jpg
chris+frank+cfx.jpg
chris+a+frank+cfx.jpg
christopher+frank.jpg
christopher+frank+cfx.jpg
christopher+a+frank.jpg
christopher+a+frank+cfx.jpg
chrisfrank+cfx.jpg

Source: Abduzeedo

Fold Collection

Brooklyn-based Uhuru, a multi-disciplinary design firm, has produced the amazing Fold Collection that is inspired by flattened debris found in the streets of New York City. Uhuru took the concept a step further by replicating the natural patina that happens to the materials as they weather the outdoor elements. The pieces in the collection, which includes consoles, a bench, coffee table, and end tables, will age over time to slowly revealing character.

Our new Fold Collection is inspired by the forms created by objects flattened in our neighborhood streets, in particular the metal straps used to attach goods to pallets and boxes here in industrial Red Hook.
— Uhuru

Source: Uhuru Design

150 Years of Frank Lloyd Wright

Fallingwater, Robert P. Ruschak, courtesy of the Western Pennsylvania Conservancy

Fallingwater, Robert P. Ruschak, courtesy of the Western Pennsylvania Conservancy

June 8 marked the 150th anniversary of Frank Lloyd Wright’s birth and his legacy is still strong and ahead of it's time. He developed and was an advocate for sustainable architecture even before it was a concept within popular culture.

His design aesthetics stemmed from simplicity and the idea that we should live more harmoniously with the land. Below are some amazing examples of his work and legacy that will likely live on for another 150 years.

Taliesin West evening, photographed by Andrew Pielage

Taliesin West evening, photographed by Andrew Pielage

Andrew Pielage; Copyright Frank Lloyd Wright

Andrew Pielage; Copyright Frank Lloyd Wright

He wanted us to take a more gentle approach to structuring our lives, and created buildings that were on the land, not of the land.
— Stuart Graff | President & CEO of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation
David and Gladys Wright House in Phoenix, Arizona

David and Gladys Wright House in Phoenix, Arizona

Westcott House, courtesy of Marta Wojcik, photographed by Rod Hatfield

Westcott House, courtesy of Marta Wojcik, photographed by Rod Hatfield

Taliesin West interior, photographed by Andrew Pielage

Taliesin West interior, photographed by Andrew Pielage

Andrew Pielage; Copyright Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation

Andrew Pielage; Copyright Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation

A Compact Apartment in Kiev

chris frank

Stunning apartment interior in Kiev designed by MARTIN Architects that features a glass-encased bedroom utilizing only 484 square feet. The design requirements were for the space to be functional while also appealing to renters within the area.

The bedroom was partitioned off with framed glass so light still passes thought while also offering the space privacy when the curtains are closed.
— Caroline Williamson | Design Milk

Source: Design Milk

The Modern Influence of Frank Lloyd Wright

Design Milk has published a very interesting article about Frank Lloyd Wright's influence not only on architects, but the creative community as a whole. Contemporary designers and architects share how Wright's key design principles influence their work to this day.

He had an overarching belief that architecture, which encompassed both interior and products, should be a complete work of art and that all elements should contribute to the whole.
— Amy Azzarito | Design Milk
Michael Bierut , Inner City Infill, 1984 from the collection at  MOMA

Michael Bierut, Inner City Infill, 1984 from the collection at MOMA

What floored me was the sense of transformation. You felt like a miracle was being formed before your eyes in stone and glass and steel. It’s also not merely a piece of sculpture. It’s the fulfillment of a functional request. Someone wanted a house and Wright did it in such an otherworldly, graceful and beautiful way.
— Michael Bierut

Frank Lloyd Wright upheld a holistic approach of how every home and building should be designed as a unified vision of design and craft with utmost respect for nature and materials
— Eric Chang | Hellman-Chang

Artwork by Colette Vermeulen

Artwork by Colette Vermeulen

The way Frank Lloyd Wright abstracted nature was a big source of inspiration. Each shape in nature can be brought back to pure elementary forms like circles and triangles. The way Frank Lloyd Wright created living spaces in which nature is amplified rather than disregarded, inspired me to create images that are not restricted by a rectangular frame and that emphasize the purest elementary forms.
— Colette Vermeulen

Source: Design Milk