"Speed" for Canon by Horst Friedrichs, Melville Brand Design, & Slanted Publishers

 
 

At Melville Brand Design our focus is branding and editorial design. What is quite unique about us is that we are also able to add content and stories to our client's projects. The fascinating images by London-based photographer Horst A. Friedrichs provided the story on the surface. Beyond the printed results we created and organized an evening event that attracted a very similar crowed of fuel-infused city dwellers and motor bikers - similarities to the Speed images were intended.

 
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Speed is the answer. Our client Canon Europe Océ Printing Systems sells a whole range of digital printing press machines. Most of them are multi-format machines, all of them print incredibly fast. To present these machines in a large-scale in-house event it was Melville's task to create exciting and meaningful content. This content was used for the overall appearance of the location, outside and inside, all decoration and most important, the print results in all possible formats that were printed on the machines these days. Needless to say, that the theme "Speed" fitted the machines' main benefit.

 
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SOURCE: Behance

Perception Vs. Reality

chris frank st. louis

As Rolling Stone magazine just put itself up for sale, it's interesting to look back at one of their more iconic ad campaigns aimed at broadening their readership. The "Perception Vs. Reality" campaign sought to generate more advertising revenue by using visual metaphors to show who the typical Rolling Stone reader actually was—not who he/she was thought to be.

At that time, the brand still had a large and engaged audience of readers, but ad buyers tended to dismiss them as dope-smoking hippies who weren’t a valuable target for ads.
— Katie Richards | AdWeek

The ad reads, “For a new generation of Rolling Stone readers, expressing your individuality does not mean wearing your birthday suit to a rock festival. During the past 12 months, Rolling Stone readers purchased more than 80 million items of apparel, setting the trends and shaping the buying patterns for the most influential consumers in America. Your media buy looks conspicuously naked if you’re not exposing yourself in the pages of Rolling Stone.”

Source: AdWeek

OCBC Brand Direction

 
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Oversea-Chinese Banking Corporation Limited is one of the world’s most highly-rated banks and is based in Singapore. In China, the color red over-saturates much visual palette. Alexander Lygin, based in Moscow, had the idea to create a branding scheme not focused around the traditional implementation of the People’s Republic lurid red. His approach is a refreshing and crisp change of pace that put’s less focus on color recognition and places more value on the actual brand.

SOURCE: Abduzeedo

Lavish Portraits of Missouri Citizens by Kehinde Wiley

 
“Madame Valmant”, 2018

“Madame Valmant”, 2018

 

Painter Kehinde Wiley is renowned for his large-scale portraits of Black subjects. His most recent body of work is on view at the Saint Louis Art Museum, and draws inspiration from eight works of art in the museum’s collection, which are referenced in all but one of his paintings’ titles. Kehinde Wiley: Saint Louis is comprised of 11 portraits of people the artist met in 2017 on the city’s north side and in nearby Ferguson.

“Jacob de Graeff”, 2018

“Jacob de Graeff”, 2018

“Charles I”, 2018

“Charles I”, 2018

“My job is to see things in an accurate context in a society where so often black people are reduced to simple stereotypes,” Wiley explained in an interview with the St. Louis American. “What I’m doing is slowing down and taking time to honor people from every little detail of their being.  From their nails to the type of jeans that they are wearing – or that sort of timidity or boldness of their character.” The resulting portraits are filled with Wiley’s signature jewel tones and elaborate pattern work that interacts with his subjects, both showcasing and enveloping each figure. As contemporary Black Americans in their own clothing strike the grand postures of white Europeans of centuries past, Wiley juxtaposes the traditions and tensions of race and representation in the art world.

 
“Three Girls in a Wood”, 2018

“Three Girls in a Wood”, 2018

 

Kehinde Wiley: Saint Louis is on view at the Saint Louis Art Museum (which is free and open to the public) in Saint Louis, Missouri until February 10, 2019. You can watch a video of the artist’s in-depth talk at the museum here. Wiley also shares his completed and in-progress works on Instagram.

SOURCE: Colossal

Landforms Arise Out of Carved Hardback Collections by Guy Laramée

 
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Guy Laramée (previously) erects topographic specimen from collections of vintage books. His carved sculptures imitate the mountains of knowledge once physically collected in books rather than compiled via digital means.

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In this series of new works from 2017-2018 the Montreal-based artist incorporates traditional methods of book organization as integral parts of the sculptures— such as box set containers, simple wood stands, and metal bookends reminiscent of public libraries. Laramée’s work is included in the group exhibition “Unbound” at TwoRivers Gallery in Prince George, British Columbia through March 31, 2019. You can see more of his sculptural takes on vintage anthologies on his website.

 
 

SOURCE: Colossal

InVision's Design Maturity Report that Redefines the Way We Work

InVision is releasing one of their largest design studies to date! I am excited to share their Design Maturity report helping companies analyze where they lie in the spectrum and understand how they can create better business outcomes with a strong design practice across an organization. I have personally worked in the financial industry for a while and design is still not part of the strategic seat even if they grow their UX teams to the masses. Hope this will change sooner. I have shared some of the key findings but I would definitely advice you to download the report and give it a good read.

 
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An industry-spanning report that redefines design maturity today. InVision surveyed thousands of companies to explore the relationship between design practices and business performance. Explore the highlights here, and download the full report now to transform the way you work.
— In their words
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Giving designers a strategic seat at the table is essential to success, Tier 5 companies are:

  • 4x more likely to report that design had a positive impact on their revenue

  • 5x more likely to see cost savings

  • 6x more likely to decrease their time-to-market

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Design impact takes more than just hiring some designers.

  • InVision found that higher reported business benefits are correlated with deeper involvement by people outside of the design organization.

  • Design team size isn’t predictive of maturity. It’s possible to dedicate a lot of resources to design and still see small returns if the design team, its processes, and supporting structures aren’t properly calibrated.


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The banking industry is known for its large UX teams, yet it lags when it comes to design maturity. This is a prime example of how investing in resources has diminished effects without incorporating design into business strategy overall.

Entertainment and media skew less mature than the average overall. Still, the number of Level 4 companies is over 50% higher than average. While most entertainment and media companies are hewing to outdated design approaches, a sizable and competitive subset are pushing industry norms forward through experimentation, analytics, A/B and beta testing, and beta measurement.

Download the full report - It’s worth reading through.

SOURCE: Abduzeedo

GRIS: Explore a Surreal Watercolor Landscape in a New Video Game by Nomada Studio

 
 

GRIS is a new game designed by Nomada Studio that leads users through a surreal watercolor inspired landscape filled with crimson mountains, square trees, and overgrown ruins. The style of and thinking behind this visual experience are revolutionary. There is no danger or death in the detailed lurid pastel world, but rather, the opportunity for meditative exploration with the main character as she unlocks new worlds and abilities. The video game features an original score, which perfectly matches the tone of its soft, gestural graphics.

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The game design mimics the way watercolor pools on paper, with splotches of color often falling outside of the lines in the main character’s face, the hills she slides down or the trees that she interacts with. “In our game the scenery is very important, and sometimes takes the spotlight over the main character,” says the studio.

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GRIS is the first video game by the Barcelona-based Nomada studio, and will be released this December for both Nintendo Switch and PC.

SOURCE: Colossal

A Dozen New Stamps Celebrate Leonardo da Vinci’s Drawings

 
The head of Leda (c.1505–08), on view at Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool

The head of Leda (c.1505–08), on view at Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool

 

The innovative yet timeless drawings of Leonardo da Vinci will soon be arriving in mailboxes around the U.K., thanks to a special stamp release marking the quincentennial anniversary of the Italian artist’s death. In tandem with the special stamp edition, twelve cultural institutions throughout the United Kingdom will be showcasing a total of 144 of da Vinci’s works in the dispersed show Leonardo da Vinci: A Life in Drawing. The exhibitions opened at the beginning of February and are on view through May 6, 2019 in Glasgow, Cardiff, Bristol, Leeds, and other U.K. cities. Stamp sets are available from Royal Mail.

The skeleton (c.1510–11) on view at Cymru/National Museum Wales, Cardiff

The skeleton (c.1510–11) on view at Cymru/National Museum Wales, Cardiff

The head of St. Philip (c.1495) on view at Millennium Gallery, Sheffield

The head of St. Philip (c.1495) on view at Millennium Gallery, Sheffield

Studies of cats (c.1517–18) on view at Bristol Museum and Art Gallery

Studies of cats (c.1517–18) on view at Bristol Museum and Art Gallery

The skull sectioned (1489), on view at Ulster Museum, Belfast

The skull sectioned (1489), on view at Ulster Museum, Belfast

The skeleton (c.1510–11) on view at Cymru/National Museum Wales, Cardiff

The skeleton (c.1510–11) on view at Cymru/National Museum Wales, Cardiff

A star-of-Bethlehem and other plants (c.1506–12), on view at Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum, Glasgow

A star-of-Bethlehem and other plants (c.1506–12), on view at Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum, Glasgow

 
The fall of light on a face (c.1488), on view at Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery

The fall of light on a face (c.1488), on view at Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery

 

SOURE: Colossal